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Art and Science Come Together with Chuck Close’s “My Life as a Rolling Neurological Clinic” Lecture

Chuck Close’s Self-Portrait, 1997

Art and science will make a pretty good pair when Neuroscience 2012, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, kicks off with its annual “Dialogues between Neuroscience and Society” public lecture, being delivered by artist Chuck Close.

While the focus for Neuroscience 2012 obviously trends toward the science side of things, the annual Dialogues lecture focuses on brain function and how it impacts human experience—including creativity—on an everyday level. While several speakers from past years have heralded from the art world, it’s Close’s personal connection to neuroscience, in addition to his creative prominence, that is sure to make his lecture uniquely interesting to both artists and those intrigued by the inner workings of the human brain.

What is that personal connection? Close, the National Medal of Arts recipient whose large-scale portraits of the human face have been honored by retrospectives at the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and more, has prosopagnosia, more commonly known as “face blindness,” which impairs his ability to recognize faces. It’s fitting, therefore, that his Neuroscience 2012 talk is called “My Life as a Rolling Neurological Clinic.”

“Close has a powerful story to tell about his own life and work, as well as the impact of the arts on society,” say Moses Chao, PhD, president of the Society for Neuroscience. “We are so honored he will address scientists at the meeting; it will be a powerful start to five days of emerging breakthroughs in brain science.”

Close’s lecture will take place this Saturday, October 13th, at Neuroscience 2012 in New Orleans. It is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.sfn.org/am2012/.

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