First Major Retrospective of Photographer Carrie Mae Weems Opens at Nashville’s Frist Center

A video still from Carrie Mae Weems’ Afro-Chic, on display at the Frist Center for Visual Arts. Photo courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. © Carrie Mae Weems

This Friday, September 21, marks the opening of the first ever museum retrospective devoted to the decades-long career of Carrie Mae Weems, a celebrated photographer and video artist who for the past thirty years has turned her eye on the African-Amerian experience. Approximately 225 pieces—audio recordings, fabric banners, written pieces and video in addition to photography—will be on display as part of Nashville, Tennessee’s Frist Center for the Visual Arts’ Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, where it will remain until January 13, 2013. Among the pieces being included are several never-before exhibited works, including the video Cornered, the photography project An Essay on Equivalents and several pieces representing Weems’ early documentary projects from the ’70s and ’80s.

If you’re interested in the work of Weems but aren’t in the Nashville area, worry not; the exhibition will make its way to museums in Portland, Cleveland, Stanford and New York in the weeks following its departure from Nashville. For more on the exhibition and its future travel plans, visit fristcenter.org.

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